The home page for author Eric J. Juneau

Analyzing the Disney Villains: King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)

Analyzing the Disney Villains: King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)
KING CANDY (a.k.a. Turbo)
Origin: Wreck-It Ralph (2012)

Motivation: To be played. I guess the biggest thrill in a video game character’s life is when a little boy a girl puts that quarter in, much like a toy in the Toy Story universe. I guess it’s nice to have a purpose. And terrible when that purpose goes away. All of us eventually get used up or replaced by younger, newer, fancier models that better fit the changing times. Some of us can accept that. Some of us can’t.

Character Strengths: The most diabolical thing about King Candy is his sincerity. He’s not wrong about Vanellope–a glitched character, one that allows the player to cheat, could bring down the world and condemn her to death (whatever “death” means in the video game world). This fact allows him to convince anyone who hasn’t already been corrupted (by manipulation of the game’s code helps to cement) that he is who he says he is.

Evilness: So King Candy (in his previous persona of Turbo) invaded a video game, glitched it, and got all of its characters unplugged, which I guess is like sentencing them to death. That’s pretty bad. It’s like infiltrating a gang, then getting them all arrested. But beyond that, King Candy/Turbo took over ANOTHER racing game, but learned from his mistakes. He replaced the main character’s code (Vanellope) with his own, detached her from the game, then locked everyone’s memory so no one knew the difference. Seems like the perfect crime.

Tools: King Candy was smart enough to take over a world with a little more character development than “Out Run“. That means he was able to find a racing game with a world full of minions at his command. And when you can insert yourself as the leader of those minions with a few simple button taps, what’s going to stop you? (A Donkey Kong expy, that’s who). He has what’s basically the key to Matrix-ing the world.

Also, he turns into a giant cyborg insect. That doesn’t help.

Complement to the Hero: It’s hard to know whether to compare him to Ralph, who is the more direct protagonist, or Vanellope, who is the more direct complement. After all, he’s taking Vanellope’s place as ruler of the Candy Kingdom. But in this case, I think it can be both. Both is good. He can overpower Ralph with intellect and Vanellope with charm (and minions). Both King Candy and Vanellope are confident they have a place in the game world. It’s much the story of a usurped princess and her knight in shining armor.

Fatal Flaw: King Candy’s been playing his role for so long, I think even he forgot he used to be Turbo. He looks surprised when the glitch transforms him for a second. You might call it denial, you might call it an inability to accept reality. Maybe a little bit of vanity/ego in there as well.

Method of Defeat/Death: So after King Candy is eaten by one of the cybugs he gets all their strengths and weaknesses. Like Aladdin said: “phenomenal cosmic powers, itty-bitty living space”. His new Cybug powers include an insatiable drive to go towards the pretty light that’s essentially a nuclear candy blast. I do love those ironic deaths.

Final Rating: Five stars

Abuela (Encanto)
Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

Eric J. Juneau

Eric Juneau is a software engineer and novelist on his lunch breaks. In 2016, his first novel, Merm-8, was published by eTreasures. He lives in, was born in, and refuses to leave, Minnesota. You can find him talking about movies, video games, and Disney princesses at http://www.ericjuneaubooks.com where he details his journey to become a capital A Author.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.