The home page for author Eric J. Juneau

Analyzing the Disney Villains: Bowler Hat Guy (Meet the Robinsons)

BOWLER HAT GUY (a.k.a. Michael “Goob” Yagoobian)
Origin: Meet the Robinsons (2014)

Motivation: A long time ago Bowler Hat Guy was Lewis’s roommate in the orphanage. Because of Lewis’s late-night inventing, he doesn’t get enough sleep before the night of the big baseball game. When he falls asleep (standing up) in the outfield, he misses the winning catch. This caused his teammates to beat him up in full view of the audience and coaches and everyone.

Coach gives him some advice to let it go, and he’s about to take it when his future self (Bowler Hat Guy) comes in and tells him not to. Tells him to use it as fuel for his hatred, use it as motivation, “let it fester and boil inside of you”. As a result, he never gets adopted, grows up to be angry and bitter and never leaves the orphanage. And he blames Lewis for all this, until one day he finally decides to strike back… by egging Lewis’s house. That’s when he meets the hat (more on that in a minute) and becomes Bowler Hat Guy. Anyway, he provided his own motivation for his evil deeds.

Character Strengths: Probably has the fewest character strengths of any Disney villain. He reminds me a little of Doctor Octopus from Spider-Man 2, where he’s controlled by a malevolent AI that’s part of his body. Said AI acts like his id, fueling his desires to further her own ends.

Evilness: As a kid (Goob), he’s an annoying little twerp who talks too much and looks weird with dark sunken eyes like Tim Burton is his real father. He grows up to look like he should be tying a woman to some railroad tracks somewhere. He’s got a ridiculously evil look with the hat, stubble, exposed forehead, sinister smile, crooked teeth, black clothing, bushy eyebrows, bony fingers, and evil laugh. The only real act of evil he does is sabotaging a little kid’s science experiment for revenge? Not great. Just about everything else can be attributed to his hat. Who knows where the bowler hat begins and Bowler Hat Guy ends?

Tools: So now we talk about DOR-15 a.k.a. Doris a.k.a. the bowler hat. It was invented by future Lewis as a “helping hat”. But something was “wrong” with it (e..g chaos and evil from malevolent AI) so Lewis stored it in his vault of failures. Doris didn’t like that and escaped. Then it met up with Bowler Hat Guy (I guess he was just Guy then) and waited for the opportune moment to strike back. Said opportune moment came when Lewis’s future son leaves the time travel machine garage open. Bowler Hat Guy’s plan is to kidnap Lewis, force him to fix the memory scanner, sell the memory scanner to a big company, and ruin Lewis’s future.

Doris is pretty much just Hal or the steering wheel from WALL-E. It acts a little like a drone, especially because it can fly/hover, and most commonly uses tentacles with knives on the ends. It can take make offspring, control anyone’s mind, including a surprisingly limber Tyrannosaurus Rex. Unfortunately, the T-Rex is no match for modern technology, like a speeding train. (Do you ever get the sense that this script was written by manatees?) Unfortunately, Doris is no match for the power of time paradoxes.

Complement to the Hero: This movie is unique in that it pretty much contains ALL the villain’s origins and motivations. Both come cut from the same cloth. Goob is incompetent where Lewis is not. Goob doesn’t think plans through. Both drive forth the lesson of the movie, which is to let go of the past and “keep moving forward”. Because forward is the only way one can go.

But back to Goob. And this part I love–really the only redeeming part of the story–in that Lewis provides the origins for Bowler Hat Guy. Lame and contrived as it is. Because of Lewis’s late-night inventing, Goob didn’t get enough sleep before the big game. I bet there’s an element of his depravity that comes from this sleep deprivation. You know growing kids need rest most of all.

Fatal Flaw: There’s no good place to put this, so I’m putting it here–this was a bad time for Disney. Meet the Robinsons came out in the same period as Bolt, Chicken Little, Home on the Range, Brother Bear, and other highly forgettable movies in the 2000s where every other character is voiced by Patrick Warburton. I mean, come on–your inciting incident is leaving a baby on the doorstep of an orphanage in the rain? So cliche. And outdated–orphanages stopped long before 2007. Anyway, I’m supposed to talk about Bowler Hat Guy, I guess.

His big flaw is immaturity. He comes up with plans, but never thinks them through. I’m sure this has something to do with that one baseball incident (where his team beat the ever-loving snot out of him) but who cares.

Method of Defeat/Death: Once his plans are foiled, he just kinda walks away. That’s it. Oh, then Lewis just alters the timeline so Goob wakes up to make the winning catch, totally negating the timeline. So he learns no lesson and suffers the least cinematic comeuppance I’ve ever seen.

Final Rating: One star

Previous Analyses
John Silver (Treasure Planet)
Yokai (Big Hero 6)
The Agent (Bolt)
The Spirits (Frozen II)
King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)
Abuela (Encanto)
Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

Analyzing the Disney Villains: John Silver (Treasure Planet)

JOHN SILVER
Origin: Treasure Planet (2002)

Motivation: A long time ago a pirate named Flint stole treasure from “a thousand planets” (side note: gold and gems are apparently still valuable when you have access to every planet in the galaxy). Somehow Silver found out about this and a map leading to the location. Young boy Jim Hawkins got that map, leading to a commissioned mission to find the treasure. Silver and a band of his unruly scalawags integrated into the mission to steal the treasure for themselves. Gotta admit, the “loot of a thousand worlds” does sound appealing.

Character Strengths: Silver is a charismatic bloke. A fun guy. Quick with a joke. He’s designed after the other affable Disney bears (Baloo, Little John, Humphrey, Winnie-the-Pooh). Silver has no ego that gets in the way of his desires. He can be a lowly ship’s chef as long as that gets him closer to his goal. He knows how to butter people up. Captain Amelia is generally impenetrable, but Jim falls for Silver telling him he was always meant for greatness. The problem is that Silver starts to believe this himself, as he’s sympathetic to those with a hard life.

Evilness: Silver is ultimately only out for himself, like any pirate. Offers to join his crew notwithstanding, Silver wouldn’t hesitate to abandon one of his men to the spacewolves if it served his own needs. He’s a pirate through and through–greedy, ruthless, a liar, a mutineer, a bully, a thief, and a murderer.

Tools: Lots! He’s a cyborg so he’s got a robotic arm that can swiss army knife into just about anything, including an arm cannon, scissors, a blender, a spatula, a meat cleaver, and a crutch. The leg is a little less useful, as it apparently operates like a bellows(?) and is vulnerable to stabbing. Plus he’s got a targeting eye that changes colors with his mood and a mechanical ear. As far as henchmen goes, he’s got a band of cut-throat pirates. But their loyalties are questionable and he has a problem keeping them in line. (Though that spider-crab alien is pretty nightmarish.) And there’s Morph who acts as the parrot on his shoulder who comes in handy now and again.

Complement to the Hero: Silver and Jim have a father-son dynamic that comes about by a montage where he tries to exhaust Jim with work. Otherwise, the curious and impressionable boy might find out about Silver’s band of bloodthirsty mutinous pirates (which he does). This is the most fascinating part of the movie, not only because it diverges from the source material, but Disney does not have a great track record with father figures. For every Gepetto there’s a bumbling oaf like King Fergus or moron like Buck Cluck (or they’re just dead). Silver has no compunction about stabbing a guy but has genuine love for the boy. He even gives up the treasure to save Jim when the planet is self-destructing. He can’t even lie to himself about liking the boy. It’s a bold authorial decision to change Silver from an irredeemable antagonist into an anti-hero.

Fatal Flaw: Silver actually gets over his, which is a lifelong sense of greed. He realizes the friendships he made along the way are more valuable and fulfilling than riches. The funny part is Silver foreshadows this when he tells his band not to let their desire for treasure get the best of them. But there’s an element of Silver’s scoundrel self-preservation that never goes away when he escapes from the ship rather than go to jail.

Method of Defeat/Death: After escaping the exploding planet (and enough treasure to disrupt the galactic economy), Silver retreats below deck to snatch a longboat. Jim confronts him and there’s a tense stand-off, but Jim decides to let him go. Silver offers to take him with, but Jim decides to “chart his own course” (one that’s a little more legit and has less backstabbing). Silver admits his admiration for the boy, they hug, and Silver leaves for greener stars.

Final Rating: Five stars

Previous Analyses
Yokai (Big Hero 6)
The Agent (Bolt)
The Spirits (Frozen II)
King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)
Abuela (Encanto)
Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

Analyzing the Disney Villains: The Spirits (Frozen II)

frozen 2 snowflake
THE SPIRITS OF THE ENCHANTED FOREST (a.k.a. the Elements)
Origin: Frozen II (2019)

Motivation: This movie is, in a word, messy. There are too many protagonists and each has their own motivations (Elsa has wanderlust, Anna wants things to stay the same, Kristoff wants to propose, Olaf wants to be relevant to the plot). So how can the antagonist not be equally messy?

As far as I can figure, Ahtohallan chose that particular moment in time to call out to Elsa (just in time for the second movie to start). It wants Elsa to learn the truth so that the dam can be broken and the river can flow again. But it does this in the weirdest way.

Why do the spirits keep attacking them? The little salamander sets fire to the camp, the wind spirit assaults Olaf, the water spirit horse attacks Elsa, the Earth Giants nearly kill Anna with rocks. Who are they working for? Why don’t they want to help? Don’t they want the land to be freed as well?

Character Strengths: When you’re talking spirits of nature, you’re talking about all the destructive power that goes along with it. Earth giants can throw boulders. Salamanders can scoot around and set everything ablaze. Wind spirits can whip you around in a tornado. Of course, the question is, do they hold a candle to Elsa’s power?

The answer is no. Elsa dispatches the tornado by bringing down the temperature, smacks the little fire lizard around, tames the horse and… well we don’t see her interact with the rockbiters. But if she did, I bet they’d get a walloping.

Evilness: Like nature, I don’t think the spirits are evil or good. They simply are. They do what they do. Of course, that’s a petty excuse, because once you anthropomorphize something, you’re giving it a modicum of free will. Meaning I have no idea what the spirits want. They have power, but what are they using it for, besides giving our protagonists some obstacles. They don’t gain anything by keeping Elsa from the river of Ahtohallan. Wouldn’t the spirits want to work in conjunction with Ahtohallan? Is there a jealousy thing here?

Tools: Each spirit, like the cliche expects, has its own weapons according to its specialties. Fire can set things on fire, wind can blow things over, etc. Just imagine any X-Men, but Disneyfied (wait, doesn’t Disney own X-Men now?)

Complement to the Hero: Ironically, as we find out in the ending (spoilers), Elsa is the Fifth Spirit. The one who acts as a bridge from the natural world to the human world. So they are both cut from the same cloth. (Literally, as one of the Northuldra uses a cloth to demonstrate this.) Of course, none of this explains how Elsa got cursed/blessed, what she did to deserve it, who did it, and so on. Nor does it explain why the spirits keep trying to kick her out. What are they afraid of?

Fatal Flaw: I’m not sure what to put here because the spirits are pretty mindless. I don’t understand their motivations, their evilness, so I can’t think of what their fatal flaw might be. Ignorance? Lack of understanding? This movie is a mess. I’d make a case for the movie’s writers to be the real antagonists. Do you see how many questions I’ve asked in this article?

Method of Defeat/Death: Well, they aren’t really defeated either. Anna teases the rock monsters to destroy the dam. This opens up the river, lifts the fog, and frees everyone inside. Yet the spirits are still around. One even acts as a mail carrier. Another acts as a highly merchandisable pet, but we don’t talk about Bruni.

Final Rating: One star

Previous Analyses
King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)
Abuela (Encanto)
Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

Analyzing the Disney Villains: King Candy (Wreck-It Ralph)

king candy wreck-it ralph
KING CANDY (a.k.a. Turbo)
Origin: Wreck-It Ralph (2012)

Motivation: To be played. I guess the biggest thrill in a video game character’s life is when a little boy a girl puts that quarter in, much like a toy in the Toy Story universe. I guess it’s nice to have a purpose. And terrible when that purpose goes away. All of us eventually get used up or replaced by younger, newer, fancier models that better fit the changing times. Some of us can accept that. Some of us can’t.

Character Strengths: The most diabolical thing about King Candy is his sincerity. He’s not wrong about Vanellope–a glitched character, one that allows the player to cheat, could bring down the world and condemn her to death (whatever “death” means in the video game world). This fact allows him to convince anyone who hasn’t already been corrupted (by manipulation of the game’s code helps to cement) that he is who he says he is.

Evilness: So King Candy (in his previous persona of Turbo) invaded a video game, glitched it, and got all of its characters unplugged, which I guess is like sentencing them to death. That’s pretty bad. It’s like infiltrating a gang, then getting them all arrested. But beyond that, King Candy/Turbo took over ANOTHER racing game, but learned from his mistakes. He replaced the main character’s code (Vanellope) with his own, detached her from the game, then locked everyone’s memory so no one knew the difference. Seems like the perfect crime.

Tools: King Candy was smart enough to take over a world with a little more character development than “Out Run“. That means he was able to find a racing game with a world full of minions at his command. And when you can insert yourself as the leader of those minions with a few simple button taps, what’s going to stop you? (A Donkey Kong expy, that’s who). He has what’s basically the key to Matrix-ing the world.

Also, he turns into a giant cyborg insect. That doesn’t help.

Complement to the Hero: It’s hard to know whether to compare him to Ralph, who is the more direct protagonist, or Vanellope, who is the more direct complement. After all, he’s taking Vanellope’s place as ruler of the Candy Kingdom. But in this case, I think it can be both. Both is good. He can overpower Ralph with intellect and Vanellope with charm (and minions). Both King Candy and Vanellope are confident they have a place in the game world. It’s much the story of a usurped princess and her knight in shining armor.

Fatal Flaw: King Candy’s been playing his role for so long, I think even he forgot he used to be Turbo. He looks surprised when the glitch transforms him for a second. You might call it denial, you might call it an inability to accept reality. Maybe a little bit of vanity/ego in there as well.

Method of Defeat/Death: So after King Candy is eaten by one of the cybugs he gets all their strengths and weaknesses. Like Aladdin said: “phenomenal cosmic powers, itty-bitty living space”. His new Cybug powers include an insatiable drive to go towards the pretty light that’s essentially a nuclear candy blast. I do love those ironic deaths.

Final Rating: Five stars

Abuela (Encanto)
Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

Analyzing the Disney Villains: Abuela (Encanto)

abuela encanto

Oh my god, am I really doing new ones? It’s been so long since I wrote this series and times, they do a-change. I’ve seen some of the films I originally skipped, new ones have been made, and people have actually made a few requests. So let’s waste no words.

ALMA “ABUELA” MADRIGAL
Origin: Encanto (2021)

Motivation: Abuela’s actions are rooted in staying worthy of the miracle that allowed to escape the marauders that forced her from her hometown. She received a second chance when her husband sacrificed himself for his people and his family. That chance is in the form of a candle that indicates the “health” of the magic.

And she is so afraid of losing that magic, she expects perfection out of her offspring. Except for Mirabel, who has nothing to offer. Her motives are so strong they trickle down to the family, so that Luisa can’t relax, Isabela can’t grow anything but beautiful flowers, and Bruno has to exile himself when everyone perceives his prophecies as doing damage (but we don’t talk about Bruno).

Abuela has to sweep up all of Isabela’s flowers

Character Strengths: There is a certain something to be said for stubbornness. As the matriarch of her family, it gives her equal parts nurturing and respect. You don’t want to disobey Abuela, but you don’t want to disappoint her either. After all, she led you to a protected place, gave you a magic house, and provided you with a special superpower. I’d call her on her birthday if I were you.

Evilness: Not very. That’s what I like about Encanto–there is no real bad guy. The bad things people do are done with excellent reasoning behind them. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Abuela would welcome you in with a cup of coffee and a healing arepa and never harm a hair on your head. But if you’re not pulling your weight as part of your family, you’ll be scorned so bad.

Tools: These are some of the most interesting tools I’ve seen. She’s got a rockin’ candle that never goes out. As long as it stays lit, her offspring have superstrength and weather control. In fact, they’re kind of like henchmen, doing her bidding. Even if that means babysitting and fetching goats, it’s still bidding.

The magic is also the fuel for Casita, an enchanted house that seems to have consciousness, a little like Howl’s Moving Castle, except, you know, it doesn’t move. But it can reform itself (generally)–move objects by rippling the floor, change staircases, communicate non-verbally. But it seems to be beholding to the magic of the candle because it was not in control of Mirabel’s non-gift. Surely if it was, it would have offered an explanation.

Complement to the Hero: Mirabel and Abuela are reflections of each other. Abuela is hard as a rock, stiff. She’s seen some shit. Mirabel plays it looser. You can see it in their animation styles. Mirabel’s always moving her head, her shoulders, her limbs, nearly every word she says. Abuela stands stiff as a board. Unyielding. But if their positions were switched, Mirabel could easily become Abuela and vice versa.

Fatal Flaw: Fear. Maybe coupled with some paranoia. It’s not like it’s not justified. She had to run away from her hometown, saw the love of her life killed before her eyes just after giving birth to triplets. This makes her stern, firm, but also quick to see the worst side of the scenario.

However, everything has been berries and cream since then and it’s been, what, forty years? Fifty? How old does Bruno look? It’s hard to tell in a cartoon (we don’t talk about Bruno’s… social security). You can add in a little denial there too, because she doesn’t believe Mirabel that Casita is cracking (maybe because she already assumes the worst in her).

Method of Defeat/Death: First Disney villain to be defeated with hugs. Mirabel and Abuela come to an understanding at the river, where they realize they both want what’s best for the family. But she was too hard on them because she was so afraid of losing the miracle by failing to earn it. And it wasn’t fair for her to take out her fear on the family. She was burdened by the evil that men do, but her children and children’s children hadn’t. And after all, isn’t that what we all want for our families? To live a better life than we had?

Final Rating: Three stars

Prince Hans (Frozen)
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)

I Am All the Bad Guys

venom bad guy

A week ago, I voluntarily went to a seminar/exercise about “workplace styles, motivators, and communicators”. I thought this would be good for me to learn ways to be a leader when you’re an introvert. (I’m supposed to be a tech lead in my new job, but so far I haven’t done anything leady yet. And I’m dreading it. None of my experiences with being a leader have been positive or yielded positive results. But you can’t advance in this line of work unless you take some kind of management role. )

Unfortunately, this seminar wasn’t what I thought it would be. I thought they’d bring in a speaker or professional expert on the subject. But it was just a guy who works here (at my new job). And I think most of the attendees were people on his team.

Not to say any of this is bad. The big disappointment was that the content wasn’t what I thought it would be.

I wanted it to be about how to make your personality work with other kinds. Like finding adapters and techniques to work with extroverts, charismatics, etc. It was more about knowing who you are. Well, I already know who I am. I’m ISTJ. Heavily introverted and judging, fair to middling on sensitivity/intuition and thinking/feeling. An analytical person.

personality test word cloud

A large chunk of this class was taking time to take a Meyers-Briggs test on 16 Personalities. I’d taken M-B’s before, but not on this site. It’s got a cute little interface. I found out that these days I’m an INTJ these days, which they label as “architect”. Doesn’t surprise me–the last time I took it, only one point sepearated my N from the S. They’ve also added a -A/T for “identity”, either Assertive or Turbulent (I’m turbulent, which means I like organization and plans). They even had a little list of TV and real-life people that match your personality.

The answers did not please me.

Let’s take a look at the list of so-called “Architects”:

  • Elon Musk (called a guy who rescued kids trapped in a cave a pedophile)
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger (steroid infused actor turned governor turned washout)
  • Vladimir Putin (current stand-in for Saddam Hussein as evil foreign leader)
  • Michelle Obama (former first lady – practically perfect in everyway)
  • Friedrich Nietzsche (asshole philosopher, claimed God was dead)
  • Christopher Nolan (makes films that seem artsy and depth but don’t make sense when you look past the surface)
  • Colin Powell (Republican politician – ’nuff said)
  • Samantha Power (UN ambassador — couldn’t find anything wrong with her, but I’m sure there’s something)
  • Walter White (Breaking Bad – made meth)
  • Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish (Game of Thrones – manipulated several people into his own machination, including one resulting in the death of Eddard Stark)
  • Tywin Lannister (Game of Thrones – stood as judge of his son’s kangaroo court, killed by a crossbow on the potty)
  • Gandalf the Grey (Lord of the Rings)
  • Yennefer of Vengerberg (The Witcher – I have no idea who she is)
  • Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games)
  • Seven of Nine (Star Trek: Voyager – former Borg)
  • Professor Moriarty (Sherlock Holmes’ arch-nemesis)
bad guys club

Yeah, they’re architects. Architects of destruction. Do you see how many bad guys are on this list? How many villains? Even middling good guys I can point out some grievous sins, like Schwarzenegger’s love child with his maid, Elon Musk’s smoking up with Joe Rogan and dating some punky brewster. Even Gandalf constantly abandons his troupe.

And if they’re not bad guys, they’re jerks. Katniss Everdeen was always a bit of a two-faced pill, I thought. The only non-fictional one I could say is all good is Michelle Obama. Did everyone else’s list have this many assholes on it?

anakin skywalker

Why does life seem to keep trying to tell me I’m the bad guy. First I’m in Slytherin and now this. You have no idea how hard it is not to give in to selfish urges, to bite the bullet and do the right thing. It’s always so easy just to fulfill your whims. To eat that entire box of Rice Krispie Treats. To sit on the couch and not help with dinner. To leave your car skewed in that parking space. To buy things you’d like to have just because you want them.

There’s no earthly reward for being good, just for following the rules. You have to be GREAT. You have to be EXCEPTIONAL. Otherwise you’re just one of the cattle, one you don’t need to pay attention to because it never gets out of line. The only reason it stays good is fear. Fear of punishment, fear of consequences. The knowledge that if you do something, someone else is going to suffer and that means you have to give up your desires. It’s a bum deal man.

Couldn’t I have been anyone else from Game of Thrones? Not even Hot Pie? Or Ed Sheeran?

The Dark Side is Not an Evil Side (Obligatory “Two Sides to Every Schwartz” joke)

One of the things I wish Star Wars would do with its storytelling is to resolve that the Dark Side is not evil. Nothing is inherently evil in this world. Only humans (and some well-evolved animals) can be evil. It takes a good brain to be evil, because evil is gaining pleasure from the pain of others.

So not spiders or guns or poison or magic or anything is evil. It’s what you do with those powers that determines your fate. It’s why I feel bad for Slytherin house. They all get painted with the same brush. You get sorted into Slytherin, it’s a death sentence for your social life. But there’s nothing evil about ambition or resourcefulness or determination or self-preservation.

It’s the same thing with the Force, which is essentially magic. It’s just that people who use the Dark Side of the Force keep using them for evil. But there’s nothing that says they have to hurt people. That’s why I like Kylo Ren as a character, and why I’m holding out for his redemption.

There are force-neutral powers, like telekinesis, jumping, persuasion, telepathy, and force concealment, (which is like “masking your scent”. I guess other force-sensitives can tell what side of the coin you land on so there’s a way to cover that up. Who knew?) But these powers can be used for good and evil. You can read someone’s mind and invade their privacy. Deceiving others about the nature of your powers seems like it should be on the Dark Side, but it’s not. And Persuasion is basically like mind-rape. I can’t believe there’s not more controversy about this–I guess it’s okay to force your will on someone else as long as you have a wispy beard.

star wars force infographic
Source

Midichlorian Manipulation – Create, maintain, or save life by “influencing midichlorians”. This was how Anakin believed he could stop Padme from dying. Of course, no one knows what midichlorians are or how they work, so I don’t know how this can be called good or evil. In fact, this might be all bupkiss, made up by Palpatine. And isn’t healing others a good thing? The Light Side has healing, detoxification, revitalization, but if someone’s not breathing, you just stop?

Force Rage – Tap into fears, pain, and hate, turning them into rage that can increase speed, strength, and ferocity. Well, isn’t that what normal anger does? Anger isn’t an evil emotion. Anger over an injustice can lead to a greater good. If your kid is trapped under a car, fear and anger lets you lift that F150 off the ground.

Force Choke/Crush/Grip – This is just telekinesis. We always see Dark Siders doing it–lifting someone and choking them or throwing them around. They’re just focused on specific body parts. But it’s no different than anything the Light Side can do.

Force Drain – Tap into the strengths of an organic target, exhausting it immediately. Can be used to affect a wide area, depending on how mastered in the technique.This seems to be the inverse of the Force Heal (though it’s not clear if the life and vitality is transferred to the user or it just dissipates). Most of the time you see a “drain” spell, it’s in the context of magic meant to harm. Final Fantasy does this. Magic: The Gathering does this. Vampires do this. Not many arguments that removing health from someone in order to gain isn’t inherently evil, but there are examples.

In Blade, the female protagonist lets the hero drink her blood to regain his strength. I think Buffy does the same thing with Angel at some point. Rogue is an X-Man X-woman X-menman X-person superhero with power-draining powers. Metroids can drain and inject energy, and we all remember the tragic ending of Super Metroid. And in real life, there are many blood-drinking insects and animals, but they’re so small that they don’t individually do significant harm (unless they transmit a disease). And here’s a fun fact: Male garter snakes will emit and act like a female garter snake when rising from hibernation. This gets other male garter snakes to cluster and coil around them, transferring body heat and helping them wake up.(See also definition 3 of trap)

Force Slow – Cloud the target’s mind, slowing them down mentally and physically. This is a weird one, but I can see instances where it doesn’t need to be considered harmful. Like if you’re a cop and you’ve got to handle some whacked-out PCP meth-head brandishing a sword at an intersection. And Zack Morris could have used it to deal with Jessie Spano.

Force Corrupt – Temporarily manipulate the mind of another sentient being to make him/her serve your own cause. Isn’t this just Force Persuasion? And that was labeled as a core power. Moving on.

Force Lightning – This is just the collection and projection of energy. I consider it to be Force concentrated, like how electricity is concentrated fire (like all good science, this is based on Avatar: The Last Airbender, and not actual science). We only ever see Sith use it, and only ever to harm others, but that doesn’t mean it has to. Why not repower that Moisture Reclamator and help a farmer out.

Transfer Essence – Basically, you switch bodies, or transfer your soul into an inanimate object. (Does that mean anything? Like a rock? Or a droid? Or a ship? Is this where Emperor Snoke came from? I have a fan theory that Snoke is really Palpatine, who survived the fall and Death Star II explosion using his strong connection to the Force, but that’s why he’s all scarred and weird looking.) As long as you can’t “Project: Genesis” someone, this doesn’t seem so bad. In fact, Hollywood has taught us that the results are always hilarious, like in Freaky Friday and Shrek the Third, and Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.

It seems like the most distinguishing characteristic of dark Force powers is avoidance of death. The Light Side has no defense against that, except for being a Force Ghost. Not to mention we’ve seen Luke using some of these Dark Side powers (in ROTJ, he chokes some moblins in Jabba’s palace).

The best thing about Kylo Ren is how conflicted he is. He has a huge legacy to live up to. His loved ones betrayed him (Mom and Dad got divorced, Uncle/teacher tried to kill him). Everyone’s always talking about his “raw” power, but no one tells him what to do with it. He’s just a puppy looking for a master. His best strengths are telekinesis (holding blaster bolts) and telepathy, both neutral powers. And he can shrug off a bowcaster blast, something that sent a dozen stormtroopers into the sky.

So I’m looking forward to seeing what happens to him in the future. And I hope that it ties with how the force works in the context of Light Side vs. Dark Side.

What is the Point of the Sith?

hot sith woman star wars

What is the point of the Sith? They don’t seem to have a goal that their reaching towards, except for opposing the Jedi. Meaning they seem to be one-dimensional villains that only exist for the purpose of the story.

They act as a counterpart to the Jedi. In fact their credo exactly mirrors all their traits. No empathy, just ambition and power and victory. But to what end? What do they want? Keep in mind Sith is not the Galactic Empire. The empire wants control over all planets in the galaxy so they can have power/unity/order. Or so other planets with a resource can’t just say “mine, you can’t have”.

But the Sith is a philosophy/martial arts discipline, like being a Jedi. It has a credo, it has a beliefs, deities, temples, artifacts. Its main idea is obtaining of strength and power through the “dark side of the force”, meaning greed, hate, anger, and fear. It’s a very Klingon way of life–focus on fighting, victory, and passion. 

The thing about the Sith is that, instead of the Jedi who teach in collections and have a widespread population, there are only ever two Sith at one time. In the whole galaxy. Somehow they lasted a thousand years doing this, but this seems a real flawed way to establish a dominating force. You can’t exactly take over the galaxy with two people*. Not to mention that once you become a Sith, you’re either an apprentice scheming how to kill your master (which means your teaching will always end prematurely) or a master always worrying about when your apprentice is going to kill you. That’s no basis for a system of government.

*Yes, I know that Palpatine essentially did that, but he used political influence and minions in addition. He could have done that without being a Sith. I’m talking about the Sith as an entity in itself.

The Jedi have actual goals–peace and prosperity in the galaxy. But the Sith don’t seem to have goals. Or their goals are personal to the character, which still means the Sith simple exist to oppose the Jedi.

At first I was going to rant about Sith just being a one-dimensional villain. But maybe

I thought it was rather stupid to have an entity that exists solely to oppose the other party. Seems a wasteful life if your purpose is just to be the antithesis of this other guy. Then I heard about the “steak dinner”.

It’s the meeting that leaders of the Republican party had when Obama got elected in 2008. I mean, like, the day he was inaugurated. The oval office chair wasn’t even warmed yet, Obama was party-hopping, and they were making their counter-battle plan. What was that plan? To do the opposite of whatever Obama wanted.

For the sake of “their side” they had to be a united front and fight him on everything. Didn’t matter whether it made sense or not, whether it was good or not, if Obama wanted it, they didn’t that was the policy. They didn’t want to raise America up, they didn’t have an issue to push, they didn’t have a different morality to live by. They just wanted to oppose Barack Obama. If he said yes, they said no.

And the key was being united among all the party members on this. Everyone had to be in on it. For the sake of their team, every Republican had to click that “no” button when the president said “yes”. Their goal had nothing to do with America or the country or any political issue. It had to do with hurting the other guy. You didn’t win, so make it as hard for the other team as possible, no matter how petty it gets.

In other words, I thought portraying the Sith as simply opposing the Jedi was unrealistic… until I saw this. I guess it’s more plausible than I thought.

In Which I Find Out What Hogwarts House I’m In

harry potter sorting hat

I’ve never taken a sorting hat quiz. I read all the books, watched all the movies, but never truly knew which house I’d be sorted into. Maybe because I was afraid the answer wouldn’t be what I thought.

I always believed I’d be in Hufflepuff, the house for the nobodies, the extras. I’m not ambitious, I’m not clever, I’m not brave. It’s where you go if you don’t have a significant role in life. Hufflepuff is for the soldiers, the guys in the trenches working hard
and not switching sides. Those who are patient, fair, humble, and
tolerant. It’s for the people for, not so much what they are, but what they are not.

I’m not sure if the sorting hat uses the absence of traits rather than the presence. I think I do demonstrate loyalty (to those who earn it) and hard work (through writing).

There’s a fan theory that the sorting hat isn’t looking for personality traits that you HAVE, but those you find desirable or admirable. It explains why cowards like Peter Pettigrew and Neville Longbottom get into Gryffindor, and dullards like Crabbe and Goyle get to Slytherin despite not having enough personality to even get into the Hogwarts custodial closet.

Addendum to that theory is that the house cultivates those valued traits. One could argue that Pettigrew had to be brave and daring to betray his friends. And that Neville developed into someone brave and confident.

And there’s a lot of scholars who don’t like the sorting hat. It’s bad enough having cliques in school. Or getting labeled as an archetype, like jock or nerd or prep. Teenagers isolate you from others enough without having a structure in place for it. But there’s a school mandated categorization that separates you by personality.

I think it would be great if you were sorted into houses but not know why you were sorted into that house. You know there’s a reason you were lumped together, but you spend all that time figuring out why, what you have in common. Bonus points if you discover it’s all just random and there is no logic to it.

Anyway, I figured with hype around the new Time Magazine quiz, it was time to give it a try. To see if I would really be sorted into Hufflepuff as I always believed. Here are the results, weighted by veritability (i.e. how much I trust their results).

I’ve never heard of PlayBuzz so I don’t put much creedence here.
Sorting-Hat.com

Bonus points for the very domain name being specific, but still, doesn’t look sanctioned by any Powers That Be.

Now we’re getting into some that I have more faith in.

Well, this makes some sense. Everything’s pretty split down the middle. I’m just a little more “wit and wisdom” than “loyal and hard-working.

A British newspaper, and a good source of journalism.

Another Ravenclaw. Well, I guess it fits being set up with girls who are crazy or emotionally unstable.

Hm, well, that’s two for Ravenclaw and two for Slytherin. No one says Hufflepuff yet. But really how much faith can you put in these tests. They’re asking questions like “is your favorite animal a A) griffin B) badger C) raven D) snake”.

But now let’s get into the really legit tests.

Written by researchers using scientific personality tests. There’s a lot of controversy on personality tests in the social science community. Especially how no personality is set — they can change day to day, mood to mood. So they’re no clear test of, well, anything. I mean, what is a personality anyway? A set of commonly seen traits in a person’s decision making? That can be temperamental as what you had for breakfast that morning. Nevertheless, this is just for fun.

 Hmm, still disconcerting, but better Ravenclaw than another house.

What better test is there than from the progenitor itself? So far it appears that I’m not exactly what I thought I was, but if there was any test I take as gospel it would be this one. If no other tests existed, I’d still consider this the final word. This should be the ultimate decider of what house I’m in, no Susan bones about it. Let’s see what the results are.

I’m a Slytherin?

I mean, I know I have some dark parts in me, but I thought I was keeping those in check. I’m not a bad person. I don’t desire power. I’m not racist (am I?). I’m not clever or cunning. I can’t figure out those MindTrap riddles to save my life. I don’t have any ambition — I don’t want to be a politician.

I mean, yeah sometimes I see things going on and think I could do a better job than those clowns. I’m not corruptible. I don’t have any skeletons in my closet. I’d be a perfect politician, except for the lack of money and charisma. And I’m a terrible leader. I’m too selfish and can’t think on my feet. I don’t
like the idea of fraternity. Why should I be protected because I’m “one
of them”. What if I’m an asshole?

I’m trying to be brave and chivalrous, not narcissism. I mean, yeah, one of the big reasons I’m trying to be a writers is to be well-liked, to get the admiration and accolades. But that’s not authoritarian. That’s not ego-riffic.

The only trait I see that seems close is self-preservation, which means hesitating before action. Weighing all outcomes. That’s why I’m an outliner. And I never disregard the rules. Maybe I’m resourceful, but not very.

Well, I mean, come on. On a different day, it might sort me into a different house, right? Slytherin is scary. That’s where the villains all live. This is the place for Skeletor or Darkheart. The living quarters are literally IN the dungeons. Maybe it’s soothing to hear water lapping against the lake, but I don’t want to sleep among the skulls.

This is like being offered a chance to join the Hitler Youth and
their arguments for joining make sense (just not their cause). It doesn’t produce any of the kind of people I like. There’s no intellectuals. No one who likes to talk about geek stuff. They’re like Young Republicans.

And geez, what would others think of me? “Oh, he’s a Slytherin, don’t
talk to him. He’s the bad guy.” Like I need more to ostracize myself
from others. No wonder they need a sense of fraternity. It’s them
against the world. Am I just there to be the bad guy so the good guys
have something to fight?

Slytherin’s for people who play the long game. Like Byronic Snape. But he was still a total douche to Harry. Slughorn was a coward who hid from conflict and then played favorites based on non-character criteria. Regulus Black was brave enough to betray Voldemort, but it cost him his life. That’s about it for “good guys” who came from Slytherin.

Well, there is Merlin. The prefect letter mentions that. It says it’s a “cool and edgy” house (great, I’m in with all the punks and goths)

This is the first image that comes up for “cool and edgy”. Really something I want to be a part of.

It also says it’s a house that cares about honor and traditions (sounds like a frat house). They play to win. And graduates go onto great things, like Merlin. Not nursing cute little ferrets like Newt Scamander. People get sorted into Slytherin because the hat recognizes the “seeds of greatness”.

Maybe it’s that Slytherins have a long row to hoe. That seems to fit Draco Malfoy and Snape and Regulus Black, those that redeemed themselves. They had a deep pit to come back from. That sort of describes me, wallowing in my own sociopathy and trying not to succumb to those dark desires a la Jekyll and Hyde. Not everyone with that darkness inside them escape it. Some take the easy way out.

Slytherin shows that people are complex, like John Green says (where he says books allow you to “imagine humans complexly” which allows empathy/sympathy and to become a better person, not someone who assigns people simple labels). I guess that’s true. No one in Slytherin really fits a certain archetype. No one especially good at sports or knowledge. But couldn’t there be better ways to teach this lesson than with a house of bullies?

Analyzing the Disney Villains: Prince Hans (Frozen)

prince hans frozen
PRINCE HANS OF THE SOUTHERN ISLES
Origin: Frozen (2013)
prince hans motivation frozen

Motivation: Most antagonists are driven by hurt feelings or misunderstandings. Hans is a true sociopath. Yes, Prince Charming is the bad guy. And it’s just what I wanted to see. Hans falls under the sin of avarice — he’s too far down the line of succession to ever inherit his own throne, so he’s looking to marry into one. He even explains this in song (before he takes off his hollow mask of concern). What I’m wondering is — most marriages were arranged (in this time period) for the purposes of gaining land, title, or alliances. Happens all the time in Game of Thrones. Why did he have to lie about it? And was this the only kingdom Hans could find?

charstrengths prince hans frozen

Character Strengths: Deception. One hundred percent. Hey, he fooled me. I was busy analyzing the Duke of Weselton when I was in the theater. Hans only reveals his true nature when Anna is teetering between life and death. And Hans nudges the scales towards death (in a totally ineffectual James Bond-villain way, but more on that later). It’s the convincing flaws that pull you over. He’s clumsy. He can fake true love like an actor. Sheep’s clothing in a winter shawl.

What I wonder is, even if he is a psycho, could he be a good king? We never really see a demonstration of his abuse of power (although I’m almost certain that would come later, much like Scar). He demonstrates competent leadership. And although his concern for the people was false, he did provide for them (a blanket on every bed and hot glogg in every cup). But then he’s like The Stepfather – a guy doing good things with bad means.

evilness prince hans frozen

Evilness: It’s rare a Disney movie provides someone genuinely terrifying, at least for an adult. It’s okay if it goes over the kid’s head. But imagine being a father and this guy comes in wanting to date your daughter. This is a real concern of women with wealth — marrying a man who turns out to be a gold digger. His acts of heroism are only to convince those around him. He saves Elsa from the Duke boys, only to condemn her later when he can look more heroic. He’s playing the long game.

The sad part is how many women/girls remain loyal to him DESPITE all this. There are countless Hans/Elsa fan fiction and fan art. My daughter’s best friend has a Hans doll but no others because she likes him. Fans have started a petition that in the Frozen sequel, Hans should be redeemed. That’s just the power these men have over women. Even when they plainly show their true colors, they’re still loved. Eww.

tools prince hans frozen

Tools: Prince Hans has no henchmen. No big guns. No navy backing him. No allies. He works on his own, with only his words and actions to aid him. Personally, I think this makes him scarier. Imagine what he could do with some tangible strength behind him. Unlike a lot of villains, he knows how to pick his targets. I bet he wasn’t even going to say “sandwiches”.

complement prince hans anna frozen

Complement to the Hero: Before his big reveal, he’s just as adorkable as Princess Anna. Even though you know she’s going to learn not to fall in love so quickly, you don’t think Hans is going to a bad guy. He’s like the fiancee in every romantic comedy that the main character breaks up with to be with the other. That’s how all these Disney movies work, right? They’re both young, maybe a little naive, royalty, quick and impulsive. But that’s Hans’s strength. He’s a chameleon. He changes to whatever he needs to be. That’s the mark of a sociopath.

fatal flaw prince hans frozen

Fatal Flaw: Oh, Hans. Haven’t you learned anything from the mistakes of others? First you reveal your whole plan, then you lock the hero in a room without actually killing them. You just couldn’t resist showing off how smart you are. It’s a common downfall of his kind. It’s how they caught the BTK killer. But no, all you had to do was stay in the room and make sure she froze to death. That’s all you had to do. Would have taken ten minutes.

But to be fair, even I didn’t know about the lock-picking capabilities of snowman noses.

method of death prince hans frozen elsa

Method of Defeat/Death: The blizzard gets worse after Elsa escapes jail. Hans finds her on the frozen fjord and tells her that Anna died from her Sub-Zero ice blast. Elsa collapses on the ice, and when her back is turned, Hans pulls out his sword (where did that come from?) But Anna’s not quite dead yet. She must choose between saving her own life or saving Elsa’s. She chooses her sister, and as John Woo time starts, Anna steps in front of Hans’s swinging sword. In that instant, she freezes solid. So solid, Hans’s sword shatters and the blast knocks him out. When he regains consciousness, everything’s thawed and both sisters are alive. In a crowning moment of awesome, Anna punches him in the face. A diplomat takes him back to the Southern Isles, where he’ll presumably get the business from his brothers.

method of death prince hans frozen

Bonus Defeat: In Frozen Fever, Hans is shoveling manure when a giant snowball, created by Elsa sneezing into the royal Birthday Bugle Horn, sails about two hundred miles over the ocean and crashes into him. I believe his bones should be crushed instantly from impact at that velocity but, you know, it’s a cartoon.

prince hans final frozen punch anna

Final Rating: Five stars

PREVIOUS ANALYSES:
Shere Khan (The Jungle Book)
Aunt Sarah (Lady and the Tramp)
Yzma (The Emperor’s New Groove)
Percival C. McLeach (The Rescuers Down Under)
Ichabod Crane (The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad)
Lady Tremaine (Cinderella)
Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas)
Pinocchio’s Villains (Pinocchio)
Sykes (Oliver and Company)
Alameda Slim (Home on the Range)
Rourke (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
The Evil Queen (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Ursula (The Little Mermaid)
Dr. Facilier (The Princess and the Frog)
Gaston (Beauty and the Beast)
Willie the Giant (Mickey and the Beanstalk)
Hades (Hercules)
The Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland)
Jafar (Aladdin)
Shan Yu (Mulan)
Man (Bambi)
Clayton (Tarzan)
The Horned King (The Black Cauldron)
Mother Gothel (Tangled)
Cobra Bubbles (Lilo and Stitch)
Cruella De Vil (101 Dalmatians)
Madame Medusa (The Rescuers)
Captain Hook (Peter Pan)
Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound)
Madam Mim (The Sword in the Stone)
Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)
Scar (The Lion King)
Prince John (Robin Hood)
Edgar (The Aristocats)
Ratigan (The Great Mouse Detective)
Maleficent (Sleeping Beauty)