• night of the creeps poster

    My Kindertrauma: Night of the Creeps

    On a very boring Saturday, our cable was out. I don’t remember why. Maybe we had canceled it early in anticipation of moving. Anyway, this was one of those odd days where there wasn’t anything to do, and the timing was right (I remember it started at noon exactly), so I sat down in front of the floor model, wood-paneled, 198-something Magnavox and watched the best thing that was on. The best thing on was “Night of the Creeps”. Usually, I channel flip, but this time I didn’t (what would be the point with only five stations?). And Fox was still a young network at that point and in those…

  • bookshelf books

    The Books I Read: November – December 2014

    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews It’s kinda funny. It eschews notions of romance, and really, it’s more about the friend, who reminds me of Tony Goldmark. I couldn’t get that image out of my head — the deadpan, Internet snarker-troll, self-deprecating, black comedy hamball. And that’s what the book is really about. This guy is an amateur filmmaker and it talks about his love of weird, foreign, independent cinema and his friendship with Earl, a black urban youth. And in the background is Rachel, an acquaintance who is forced by Tony’s mother to hang out with because she’s dying of cancer. The story’s not about…

  • bookshelf books

    The Books I Read: May – June 2014

    vN by Madeline Ashby In the first chapter, a five-year-old child robot eats her estranged grandmother, python-style, and goes from kindergartner to adult in an instant from the additional biomass. Good opening, and there are some interesting WTF circumstances (like robots were created to fill out the Earth after the rapture) but the rest stagnates. Once again, it’s a book where the robots don’t act like robots. They act like people. The only difference is they know they were artificially created. But other than that, they eat, they fall in love, they procreate. You can’t tell the difference. The interesting things are just background — they don’t come into play…

  • zombie

    Games Someone Needs to Make: Zombie Skyrim

    I had a dream about this the other night. For some reason, I dream a lot about video games. Don’t know why. So this is a first-person, open world game, along the lines of Deus Ex, Skyrim, Fallout: New Vegas, but set in an environment like “Last Night on Earth”. Like Bioshock, all in-game cutscenes, starting from point one. You never even see who you truly are. You are rolled into a hospital ER. There’s chaos everywhere. You are not alone, as dozens of doctors and gurneys criss-cross in front of you. Nurses exposit as you ride into a holding area, talking about bite marks, rabies, standard zombie fare. As…

  • bookshelf books

    The Books I Read: November – December 2013 (Part 1)

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick It’s definitely unlike the movie. I’ve complained before about Blade Runner, and that it’s all style and lacking cohesion. The book feels a little more satirical, a little more biting, and not so concerned about looking and feeling cool. It’s really steeped in allegory and metaphor and THE MESSAGE. It’s interesting how the director saw a movie in this. The portion that made it into the film is quite minimal. He probably could have saved some money by filing off the serial numbers. The book itself? Well, it’s hard to put an opinion on it. It’s a novel to be…

  • bookshelf books

    The Books I Read: March – April 2012

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot A non-fiction book that’s basically two different narratives. One is about a breed of cervical cancer cells sampled that are able to thrive in culture — which has been a tremendous boon to scientists. With a constant supply of unchanging cells, research has opened for developing commercial drugs, IVF, and vaccines. This part also brings up issues of medical ethics and who owns your cells. Because the other part is about Henrietta Lacks, the person from whom those cells were “donated”. Also her family, and the author’s journey to find out about her. Henrietta Lacks died shortly after her cells were…

  • live and let undead hollie snider

    Live and Let Undead is Available

    Just letting you all know that Live and Let Undead: A Zombie Anthology is now out on Amazon! You may exchange illusionary money for words on paper. But not just any words. They’ve been put in a special order, scientifically formulated to please to the human brain, that is guaranteed to leave you refreshed and satisfied. That way, when the zombies come… … My lawyers have advised me not to continue the previous blog post. Those responsible have been sacked. Buy Me!

  • long corridor

    New Zombie Short Story and Big Pulp

    Well, with Merm-8’s 3rd revision done, and no touchies until December, I’m now back on the short story kick. Which is nice for a change. I do have that trunk novel I’m working on, but short stories will give me more resume-building material in the short run. I finished revising Defender based on the critique I got from “On the Premises” and sent it out to a fledgling market that deals with e-books. Sounds like I have what they’re looking for, but their pay rates are based on percentages of gross. Should be interesting to see if that pans out. My new short story is another zombie story (this makes…

  • Things In My Life Right Now

    Oh, what’s going on in my life these days… BIOSHOCK 2 Playing Bioshock 2 in my video games, kinda gave up on Bully for a while because it was slower, older, and hard to control on a keyboard. It’s a storyline sequel, not one that improves or innovates much new stuff. A lot of people say that’s bad, but I don’t really care about that. If the story is different and there’s a few gameplay modifications, that’s all right in my book. Especially if it’s a story like Bioshock. But my problem is they didn’t take out a bad part of the game — the stupid morality choices. Everything’s still…